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Evans Township Biographies

Biographical paragraphs of the residents of Evans Township, Marshall County, Illinois, as penned by Ellsworth Spencer in Records of the Olden Time, published in 1880.

Henry FOSTER

Mr. FOSTER was born in Southwick, Mass., in 1827 and moved to Connecticut with his parents when but two years old, where he learned the trade of harness making. In 1854 he came west locating at Palatine, Putnam county, Ill., and the year following removed to Magnolia and established himself in business. He married Elizabeth SQUIRES in 1849, born in Hartford, Conn., and they have three children - James F., Josephine A., and Frank H. In 1864 he moved to Wenona and opened business here. When the war broke out he enlisted in the 77th Regiment Ill., Volunteers. He was elected police justice in 1875 and served four years. Is a member of the I. O. O. F.

David STATELER

Mr. STATELER is a retired farmer living in Wenona. He was born in Licking county, Ohio, in 1806, moved to Tazewell county, Ill., in 1829, and to Putnam county in 1831. He married Mary MYERS in 1830, a native of Philadelphia, and they have fire children living - Mary (Mrs. BURNS), A. H., Almira R., Marshall and Bradford. He claimed 220 acres in Roberts township in 1831 and entered it when it came into market and opened a large farm and followed this business up to 1865, when be moved to Wenona. Mr. STATELER has filled all the responsible offices in his township and taken a leading part in public affairs. He made money in farming and knows how to enjoy it.

Isaac VAUGHN

Mr. VAUGHN was born in 1831, came to Illinois and located at Magnolia. He came to Wenona in 1858 and worked at the carpenter trade until 1862, when he enlisted in company H. of the 104th Ill. Volunteers and served until the close of the war, taking part in many of the great battles of the west . He was in Sherman's great campaign from Chattanooga to Atlanta, and thence to the sea, and took part in the grand parade at Washington. When mustered out he commanded the company. In the full of 1865 was elected county treasurer and served two years. In 1867 he returned to Wenona and established the firm of Southwell & Vaughn and still carries on the business. He married Maria ADAMS (WILLIS) in 1868 and their children are Cora, Alice, Ralph and Fred. Was elected the first mayor of Wenona and served two terms. He keeps a first-class stock of drugs and does a good business.

William J. McALLISTER

Mr. McALLISTER belongs to the firm of Stateler & McAllister, of Wenona, and was born in Ireland in 1850. He obtained a good general and mercantile education at home and in the city of Limerick, where he served in the wholesale firms of J. and T. Norton, Carnock, Tait & Co.. William J. Todd & Co. and A. and J. Mitchell, in all more than eight years. He came to Chicago in 1872 and entered into the employ of Carson, Pirie & Co., remaining until 1873, when he became a clerk for E. 8. Fowler & Co., of Wenona. Was with them three years and on his retiracy helped form the firm of which he is a member. He married in 1877, Flora SOUTHWELL, the first child born in Rutland township. Their only child, Roy, died when two years old. The firm to which he belongs does a large business and they carry an extensive stock.

J. B. HUDSON, M. D.

Dr. HUDSON was born in 1841 and came to Lacon with his parents in 1845, going from thence to Janesville, Wis., in 1851. He attended school at Evansville and Milton and completed his education at the state university, Madison. He studied medicine and graduated at the Bennett Medical college, in Chicago, and settled in Wenona, where he has been engaged in practice for 17 years. In 1878 he married Maggie LAWLESS, of Bureau county, Ill., a member of the Catholic church. He is a good physician and very successful, having built up a good practice.

John O. DENT

Mr. DENT is a capitalist residing in the city of Wenona. He was born in Monongahala county, W. Va., in 1819, and in 1823 moved with his father to Wayne county, Ind., where they remained until 1832. when they located in Putnam county, Ill. In 1849 he made his first entry of land, in Osage township, LaSalle county, which he still retains and has occupied ever since. About the name time he entered 160 acres in Evans township, Marshall county. He built his first residence in 1851. In March of 1850 he married Harriet F. SPENCER, daughter of Horace SPENCER, of Whitefield township. They have seven children living, - Frances M., Mary S., Horace F., Rosalie S., Eva L., John O., Jr. and Judith Q. He is a member of the Masonic order, and both he and Mrs. D. are members of the Chapter of the Eastern Star. He was supervisor of Osage township during the first eight years from its organization, was a member of the State legislature, filled successfully all the local offices, and was president of the Wenona Union Fair Association for the term of 1878-79. Mr. DENT is an extensive land owner, having 600 acres around Wenona, 80 acres in Gilman, and about 300 acres in Vermillion county, all of which is rented with the exception of his home farm of 120 acres in LaSalle county, just across the line from Wenona. This is composed of very choice land, especially devoted to the raising of fine stock, in which he is extensively engaged. He keeps a large number of cows for breeding purposes exclusively, and markets on an average about fifty fat steers per year. To Mr. DENT is also due the credit of starting the first nursery in this part of the country, raising from seed nearly all the trees within twenty miles of Wenona. His home farm is divided by handsome hedge fences into eleven fields, each having a grove of timber which serves admirably as shade and shelter for his stock. A main avenue with which each field connects extends through the entire farm, and is thickly lined with shade trees on either side, affording a delightfully cool and shady retreat in the warmest weather. It is a model farm the creation of a model farmer.

Charles PARKER, Dealer in agricultural machinery

Mr. PARKER was born in Norfolk county, Mass., in 1812, and came to Marshall county in 1836, locating on Round Prairie. He bought 480 acres which he farmed up to 1861, when he retired. He was active in raising funds for volunteers at Lacon at the outbreak of the war, although a Democrat himself. He retired from farming and established the agricultural implement depot at Wenona, where he has been engaged with his sons ever since. Married Maria L. DEAN in 1838. She was born in New York city. They have five children - Charles D., Ellen (GALLAHER), Jane P., George W. and Amelia. Mrs. PARKER is a member of the Presbyterian church. Mr. PARKER is a member of the Masonic order. He was justice of the peace 18 years in Marshal county. They keep all kinds of machinery for farm purposes in their establishment and carry a large stock of repairs. They keep McCormick's full line of goods, besides other reputable manufacturers. Mr. PARKER is active and pushing, and will get business when it is to be had.

E. S. FOWLER

Mr. FOWLER is a native of Massachusetts, and was born in 1821. He emigrated west in 1850 and located in Hennepin, after which he went to Caledonia. He remained here a short time and came to Wenona, engaging in the grain business, following it until 1859, when he opened up a stock of dry goods and has been in the trade ever since, transacting a large and successful business, He married Miss E. A. KNOWLES in 1865, born in Ohio, and to them three children have been born - Henry K., born in 1866, Paul, in 1868, and Georgie in 1872. When he came to Wenona and engaged in the grain trade he lived with his brother. Mr. FOWLER understands his business and keeps it well in hand. He is one of the most prosperous men in the county.

Samuel SCOTT

Mr. SCOTT was born in Washington county, Pa., in 1825, where he obtained his education. In 1844 he engaged in boating on the Ohio River, and worked his way up from fireman to captain. When the Mexican war broke out, be enlisted in the army as a teamster, and in that capacity served through the war. At the close he returned to the United States and located in Magnolia, and has been a resident of Putnam and Marshall counties since, except 19 months spent in California 1850-51. He married Mrs. Elizabeth PHILLIPS (WORTHINGTON) in 1848. She died in 1869, leaving one child, Sarah J. He married his present wife, Laura BAKER, in 1870, a native of this county. They have four children - Charles B., Julia, S. W. S. and Cornelia. He is a member of the Masonic order, also of the I. O. O. F. He and his wife are also members of the Chapter of the Eastern Star. He was collector of this township one term. He established his grocery business in 1868, and it is the oldest establishment of the kind in the city. In 1871 he associated with him in business Mr. B. F. BECHER, also an old merchant. They carry a large stock of choice groceries and provisions. They are both gentlemen of refinement, polite and attentive to all, and command a large trade.

S. B. PATCH

Mr. PATCH (of Patch & Swift), was born in Pittsburg, Pa., in 1838, and came west in 1864, locating in Ottawa, and in Peru in 1865, and in Wenona in 1870, when they started a small foundry. They have now one of the most perfect and complete establishments west of Pittsburg. In a word it is perfect in all its appointments, and having made stove repairs a specialty, they are prepared to offer to the public the largest assortment of any foundry in the west. They have castings for the repair of all kinds of stoves now in use. having gone to a large expense in getting patterns. They challenge any firm in the west to furnish as many patterns as they do. Mr. P. married Sarah A. BEAM in 1865. She was born in Johnson county, Pa. They have ten children - Ada B., Katie, Elmer E., Louis, Sarah J., Samuel J., Clomie E., Minnie, Raymond and Pheba. Mrs. PATCH is a member of the M. E. church. Mr. P. is a member of the Masonic and Odd Fellows Societies, and has served as alderman two years, and mayor
two years.

Garrett NEWKIRK, M. D., Practicing Dentist

Doctor NEWKIRK was born in Calhoun county, Michigan, May 3, 1847, and removed with his father to Stark county, Ill., in June, 1854. Studied medicine at the age of eighteen with Dr. O. W. NEWELL, then of Marshall county; attended two courses of lectures and graduated at Rush Medical College, Chicago, February 1868. Removed to Missouri in 1869, and practiced medicine and surgery there till October, 1878. Lived at Low Point and Washburn, Woodford county, five years. There being no resident dentist there, he became interested in the special care and treatment of the teeth. Made dentistry a subject of study, and liking the work, gradually withdrew from medical practice to engage in it. Located in Wenona in August, 1878, and engaged exclusively in its practice. Is a member of the Marshall and Woodford county Medical Societies, and North Central Medical Associations. In December, 1872, married Miss Martha E. MARTIN, daughter of John M. MARTIN, then of Woodford county, now of Normal. She was born in Washington county, Indiana, in March, 1850, and was brought to Woodford county the same year. Followed teaching in Woodford and Marshall counties eight years. They have had two children - sons, one of whom is dead. The name of the living child, an infant, is John Martin NEWKIRK. It is to be hoped he may live to read this Record, and first printed mention of himself.

R. C. MULHALLEN

This gentleman was born in Augusta county, Va., in 1823, moved to Park county, Ind., with his parents in 1836, and to Marshall county in 1858. He commenced business life as a farmer in Roberts township, which he continued until 1864, when he engaged in the sale of agricultural implements two years, and in 1866 embarked in the grocery business. In October of 1878 he married Mrs. Sarah A KNOFF (MORLEY), a native of Wood county, Ohio. They have two children, Clara B. and William H. Mrs. M. had one child by her first marriage, Alice KNOFF. Mr. M. is a member of the Masonic order, and has served two years in the board of aldermen

Andrew ROGERS, Prop’r Adelbert House

Mr. ROGERS was born in County Clare, Ireland, in 1819, and came to the United States in 1849, and settled in Cleveland, Ohio. Has been a citizen of Marshall county since 1860. He married Eliza RINGROSE March 17, 1849. She was born in Ireland. They have two children living Mary and Kate, and six children deceased. Are members of the Catholic church. He owns the hotel, which he is now running, and is making some desirable improvements on the property. The place is well situated for custom, and its surroundings pleasant.

J. G. FORNEY, Photographer

Mr. FORNEY was born in Putnam county in 1843. He learned his business in Hennepin, and carried on there two years, when he moved to Wenona in 1870, where he has been since. He has facilities to make any size or style of pictures, and his work is unsurpassed. He married Miss M. C. SUNDERLIN in 1870. She was born in Bureau county, Ill. They have one child - Daisy L. Mrs. FORNEY is a member of the M. E. church. He has turned out some of the finest pictures ever made in the place, is fully up with the times, and his prices are always reasonable.

J. M. HIGGINS, M. D.

Dr. HIGGINS was born in Warsaw, Wyoming county, New York, October 25, 1826. He moved west in 1842, and located in Racine, Wis., then to Almira, Jefferson county, Wis., in 1844, and to Quincy. Ill., in 1851, where he studied dentistry. He married Clara STORY in 1853, born in Lockport N. Y., and to them one child, Clarence M., was born. Are members of the Presbyterian church. He is a member of the Masonic order, and he and Mrs. H. are members of the Chapter of the Eastern Star. They moved to Havana, Ill., in 1863, where he practiced dentistry till 1866, when they removed to Chicago, where they continued the business up to 1869, during which time he was studying medicine, and graduated from the Bennet Eclectic College in that city. The same year he moved to Lawrence, Kansas, where he practiced medicine and dentistry for one year, then returned to Quincy. After that he lived in Galesburg and Streator, and finally located in Wenona in 1878. Besides the acquirements already enumerated the doctor is a fine singer and good musician, and is an excellent photographer.

E. P. BARKER

Mr. BARKER was born in Chester, Mass., in 1837, and came west in 1844, locating in Peru. He has been in the hardware business as clerk or proprietor since 15 years of age. He clerked for E. B. TREAT, of LaSalle, for several years, and started in business for himself in Wenona in 1863. He erected a fine store 22x75 feet for his business, but soon required a larger one. His present store is 22x130 feet, two story and basement, filled with a well selected stock of goods in his line, and will compare favorably with any in Chicago or elsewhere. He married a Miss Maria M. MORTON in 1864. She was born in West Randolph, Vt. They have one child, Willis E., born in 1865. Mr. Barker is treasurer of the Wenona Union Fair Association, secretary and treasurer of the Wenona Cemetery Association, and held the unenviable position of superintendent of the show and license department of the Wenona fair for six years, which he filled to the entire satisfaction of all. In fact he has filled nearly all the local positions in his community, invariably acquitting himself with credit. He is a gentleman of unusual business qualifications, polite and attentive to all alike.

James B. WORK

Mr. WORK was born in Cumberland county, Pa., in 1809, and moved to Marshall county in 1836, along with his father and brothers. Whether his ancestors were Puritans or Cavaliers, it is certain he comes from a race that loved freedom and hated slavery, and his mind was early made up on which side his influence should be cast. His home was on Crow Creek and near what is still known as "Works ford," a noted crossing place in those days. Not long after their settlement fugitives fleeing from slavery, with the north star as their guide, began to arrive and crave assistance, which to his credit be it said was never refused. In the course of time the travel increased, and his father's place became widely known as a "station" on the U. G. R. R. Fugitives came at all hours, and if there was danger of pursuit, no night was too dark or inclement to prevent his helping them to the next resting place, the hospitable cabin of William LEWIS, beyond Magnolia. How many slaves Mr. WORK has aided to escape cannot be fully told, but there were several hundred, and computed as human chattels ranked in those days, it is probable their slave owners were half a million dollars the poorer through him. In 1840 he married Mary A. MURPHY, and to them were given three children - Albert B., William W. and James P. Mrs. W. died in 1852, and in 1854 he married Sarah A. MILLER, by whom be has six children - Mary T., Grace G., Maggie L.. David E., Lizzie M. and Hattie P. Mr. WORK and his family are members of the Presbyterian church, and for 23 years he has been ruling elder.

R. F. BECHER

Mr. BECHER was born in France, near the city of Paris, in 1846. He came to the United States with his parents in 1853, locating in Sandwich, in this state, whence he moved to Arcola, and from there to Wenona in 1857. He has been in business here since 1870, and in 1871 formed a partnership with Mr. SCOTT in the grocery business. In 1867 he married Jennie McQUOWN, who was born in Kentucky. They have four children, - Frederick W., Edward B., Allen P. and Ella Pell. Mr. BECHER is a member of the I. O. O. F. and for two years has represented that order from this district in the grand lodge, belongs to the Masonic order, is township collector, alderman from the second ward and treasurer of Co. B, 10th Bat. I N. G.

J. H. JACKSON, Attorney at Law

Mr. JACKSON was born in New York, in 1835, and came west when 15 years old, living at first in Henry, where he obtained his education at the Northern Illinois University, where be remained four years. He read law with P. S. PERLEY two years, and then moved to Lacon, entering the law office of Bangs & Shaw. Not long after this be was appointed deputy circuit clerk under Sheldon ARNOLD, and served four years. He then finished his law studies and was admitted to the bar, after which he moved to Wenona and entered upon the practice of his profession in the fall of 1865. He married Miss M. J. EWALT the same year, born in Peoria county, and they have two children, Florence H. and Mabel. Mr. Jackson has been city attorney and alderman. He has a good practice in the home and circuit courts, and is regarded as a rising man. He is a good adviser, and a careful, painstaking lawyer.

John JUDD

Mr. JUDD was born in Wilks county, North Carolina, in 1825, and moved with his father to LaSalle county, Ill., in 1831, settling on Sandy creek. The next spring the Black Hawk war broke out, and the few settlers, comprising twenty-seven families, joined in the erection of a fort for mutual protection, assisted by some friendly Indians. He remembers many events but was too young to do much fighting. He married Jane BROWN in 1848, born in Fayette county, Pa. They have three children - Leroy, N. B. and Theresa. He is a member of the Masonic order and also of the I. O. O. F. Mr. and Mrs. JUDD are members of the Eastern Star. He has held several local offices of his district. The Judd family is one of the oldest and best known in the county and stands high in the estimation of the community.

Kendall E. RICH, M. D.

Dr. RICH was born in Franklin county, Mass., in 1824, came to Michigan and stopped one year and then removed to Adams county, Ill., in 1845, where he began the study of medicine with Dr. G. O. POND. He accompanied the army to Mexico in 1847 and was made hospital steward at Vera Cruz, served in the same capacity after the war. After this he came back to Adams county, completed his studies and graduated at the Missouri Medical College in 1850, and in the fall removed to Magnolia, Ill., where he commenced practice. During the war he served as assistant surgeon of the 73d Ill. Volunteers, and at its close located in Wenona, where he has since remained. In 1851 he married Julia BAKER and their children are Mary, Charles E. and Kate. The doctor was present at the first administration of chloroform in the U. S. army, has been examining surgeon since his retiracy from the service and has a large and lucrative practice.

John TAYLOR

Mr. TAYLOR is a machinist living in Wenona. He was born in Fayette county, Pa. in 1817, and came west in 1842, locating on a farm in Putnam county, which he cultivated until 1860, when he sold out, moved to Wenona and established a machine shop, in which business he has since remained, though latterly devoting a portion of his time to the cultivation of a farm. In 1844 he married Mary A. MILLS, born in Washington county, Pa. They have six children - Albert R., Joseph N., Isabella A., John F., Sarah M. and William H. They are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian church, in which he has been an elder since 1843. He has been an earnest advocate of temperance all his life, being an active member of the Good Templars, in which he occupied the position of Worthy Chief for many years, has been president of the Bed Ribbon club, and belongs to the Sons of Temperance.

Thos. B. HINMAN, Wagon Manufacturer

Mr. HINMAN was born in New Milford. Lichfield county, Conn., in 1817. He went to Binghampton, N. Y., when only 16 years old, where he commenced to learn the trade with two older brothers. Worked there until 1833, when they moved to Tazewell county, Ill., where his brothers established business and he served out his time, five years. He then moved to Canton Fulton county, and after working at jour work for a while, went into partnership with his employer, whom he soon after bought out and run the business there about eight years. He then sold out and purchased a farm and worked it until 1854. when he sold out all his interests in Fulton county and moved to Marshall county, purchasing 200 acres in Bennington township. He lived upon this about eleven years, then sold out and moved into Wenona, where he built and established his present business in 1865. He married Martha A. SHERWOOD in 1845, a native of N. Y. They have five children - Hanford H., Eliza A., Sarah E., Ada E. and Benton E. They are members of the Presbyterian church. He was school trustee and director, road commissioner, and justice of the peace in Bennington township. He was one of the first aldermen in Canton, Fulton county. He is a finished mechanic and has facilities to turn out all kinds of carriages, buggies and wagons to order on short notice.

Mrs. Jane McCALL

Mrs. McCALL was born in Montgomery, Franklin county, Ohio, and married Marshall McCALL in 1852. He was born in Washington county, Pa., in 1807. He died in 1872, leaving three sons and two daughters by a former marriage. Mrs. McCALL has one daughter by a former marriage, Henrietta G. (DENT). They are members of the Presbyterian church. Mr. McCALL was for years a leading citizen of the township. He was a man of liberal views, well read on national affairs and a deep thinker. He was the first president of the Wenona fair, and his son, John A. served one term in the Legislature, was a long time supervisor of his township and president and chief owner of the Wenona Bank.

George W. McADAM

Mr. McADAM was born in Ohio in 1811 and came west in 1857 locating in Roberts township where he followed farming up to 1865, when he moved to Wenona and went into the mercantile business, in 1858 he sold out and went to farming in La Salle county where he lived until 1871. Went to town again and staid two years, and went on to the farm again and remained until 1876. Moved to town for two years, and in 1878 he purchased 52 acres adjoining the town where he has since lived. In 1840 he married Ann J. MOORE, who died in 1865, leaving six children - George G., James, William A., Annie, Maggie and Mary. John, another son, died in the army. In 1867 he married Mrs. Mary GILL (MERCER) and they have one child, Eddie. Mr. McADAM has lived a long and useful life and is now reaping the reward of his industry.

John YEUK

Was born in Nassau, Germany, in 1844. He came to the United States in 1869 and located at Caroline Mills, Rhode Island. In 1870 he came to Mineral Point, Wis., and worked on a farm. Went to La Salle in 1871 and worked in the zinc works until 1875, when he came to Wenona, purchased property and established a carriage manufactory. Married Katie BRETZ in 1874, born in Germany. They have three children - John, Frank and Bertha. He is a member of the Catholic church. The name of the firm is Yeuk & Monk and they make all kinds of carriages, buggies, and spring wagons and do all kinds of repairing.

J. S. HUNT

Mr. HUNT was born in Licking county, Ohio, in 1825, came west in the fall of 1830, and located in Putnam county. He moved to this county in the fall of 1832, and to Wenona in 1859. He is a carpenter and builder by trade, and has steadily followed this vocation since arriving at man's estate. In 1848 he married Mary A. MYERS, born in Pennsylvania. They have six children, - Jacob A., Clara J., Salathiel M., Frank P., George and Mary J. They are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian church, of which his father, John P. HUNT, was the organizer in this county. He is a member of the I. O. O. F., and has been constable and township collector two terms each.

Rufus DOUGLAS

Mr. DOUGLAS was born in Cumberland county, Maine, and came west in 1857, first locating in Nashville, Washington county, Ill., whence be moved to Wenona in 1860 and embarked in the carriage business, which he continued until 1874, and then retired. In 1843 he married Menella A. NICKERSON, born in Massachusetts. They had one boy, Henry Clay, who enlisted in Co. I, 104th Ill. Vols.. and was killed in the battle of Mission Ridge. Mr. DOUGLAS went to California in 1849, returning in 1856. He had been a member of the Masonic order over thirty years.

L. J. HODGE

This gentleman, a member of the firm of Howe, Hodge & Ralston, bankers, of Wenona, was born in Monroe county, Ohio, in 1841, and came west with his parents in 1852, locating in Putnam county. He came to Wenona in 1865, and in 1866 embarked in the lumber business, which he followed until 1877, when he became identified with the above firm. In 1864 he married Harriet E. HOWE, a native of this state. They have two children, George O. and John G. Are members of the M. E. Church.

S. G. ALLEN

Mr. ALLEN was born in Sangamon county, Ill., in 1828, and came to this county in 1857. He married Miss Emily C. CINDIFF, in 1863. She was born in Virginia. They have four children - O. G., Bertha F., Hattie E. and Dora. Mrs. ALLEN is a member of the M. E. church. He is a member of the state grange, and owns 210 acres of land in Evans township, in a good state of cultivation.

Jamas T. RALSTON

Mr. RALSTON is a member of the banking firm of Howe, Hodge & Ralston, and was for several years with J. A. McCall & Co. He was born in Washington county, Pa., in 1845, and came west in 1864, locating in Washington, Iowa, where be lived three years, and then accepted a position in the Wenona bank and came here. He remained with it until the present firm became its successors, in the spring of 1878. He was married in 1871 to Julia McCLANAHAN, born in Brown county, Ohio, and two children have blessed their union, Hattie N. and Amelia F. They are members of the M E. church. He has served as treasurer of the Wenona Union Fair, and takes much interest in its prosperity. As a banker Mr. RALSTON stands well with the community, and the institution over which he presides has a deservedly good reputation.

Peter HOWE, Banker (with portrait)

Mr. HOWE was born in Windsor county, Vermont, in 1816, and when seventeen years old left his native place and went to Buffalo, N. Y., where he learned his trade of brick making. This was in the year 1833. He visited Putnam county and remained one year, after which he worked in various places, taking care of his money and storing his mind with information. He spent the year 1840 in Alton; then he went up to Galena, where he passed the winter of 1841-2. His wife was formerly Miss A. C. PARKS, and they have five children - Marion A., Harriet E., Jerome, Charles and Ida. Mr. HOWE is one of the wealthiest farmers in Evans township, and his money was honestly come by. There was no Credit Mobilier for him, no orphans were defrauded, nor were his gains the result of a fortunate gambling speculation on the Chicago board of trade. Himself and wife live in their comfortable home, and looking back along their busy lives see little to regret and less of duty that remains undone. In the year 1878 he established the Wenona Bank, in connection with Messrs. HODGE and RALSTON, but it is understood the most of its capital was furnished by him. In religion Mr. HOWE and his wife are Baptists, to the support of which denomination they largely contribute.

Frank H. BRANT

Mr. BRANT is a native of Illinois, born February llth, 1855. He learned the trade of a watchmaker and jeweler in Fairbury, Livingston county, worked about five months in Henry, and then located in Varna, starting in business for himself in 1876, and serving as assistant postmaster a portion of the time during his residence in Varna. In October of 1879 he moved to Wenona, where he has since carried on his business. He keeps constantly on hand a stock of goods suitable to his trade.

Abraham C. MILLER

Mr. MILLER was born in Pennsylvania in 1804. He came west in 1821 and located in Tuscarawas county, Ohio, where he lived until 1846, when he came to Illinois and located in LaSalle, where he lived until 1856. In that year he moved to Wenona and followed the carpenter business. In 1836 he married Jane PORTER, who was born in Washington county, Md., and they have three children - Andrew F., Hannah F. (Mrs. TURNER) and Richard P. Are members of the M. E. church. In 1834 Mr. MILLER walked in fourteen days from Carrollton, Ohio, to Little York and back, a total distance of 600 miles, stopping over night on the return trip at the same places he had stopped at in going.

Joseph R. FOSTER

Mr. FOSTER was born in Burlington county, N. J., in 1810, and moved to Preble county, Ohio, in 1846, and engaged in farming. In 1849 he married Margaret PELAN, a native of England, born in 1823. They have two children, John P. and Mattie A. (Mrs. WELLS). Are members of the M. E. church. John P. is a member of the I. O. O. F. Mr. FOSTER owns 160 acres of land under cultivation. John P. married Miss Lovina CLARK in 1875, a native of Ohio. She died in August, 1879, leaving one boy, Perley, born in 1876.

C. RIEDT

Mr. RIEDT was born in Wurtemburg. Germany, in 1836, and came to the United States in 1854. He first located in LaSalle, Ill., and worked at shoemaking there. He married Theresa GOETZEL in 1862. She was born in Austria. They have seven children - Lena. Anna, Amelia, William, Adolph, Delia and Gerrett. He is a member of the I. O. O. F. He has been in business for himself since 1864, carries a good stock of boots and shoes, and makes to order at short notice.

Dr. Franklin POTTS, Physician and Surgeon

Dr. POTTS was born in Warren county, Ohio, in 1829. He moved to Putnam county, Ill., with his parents in 1840, where they remained two years, thence to Cincinnati, Ohio, where he went to school. In 1856 he removed to Iowa, and returned to Chicago in 1857. He studied medicine in Richmond, Ind., with his brother, Dr. Albert POTTS, and commenced practice in Chicago in 1857. He married Miss Jennie RENCH in 1852. She is a native of Baltimore, Md. They have four children, - Wilber H., Clarence S., Edward F. and Noble F. He is a member of the Masonic order. He has been practicing in Wenona since 1868, from which he has secured a handsome income. He practiced one year in Magnolia, Putnam county, and three years in Mendota, finally locating permanently in Wenona.

A. COHN

Mr. COHN was born in Germany, and came to the United States in 1853, locating in New York city. He moved to Chicago in 1857, and to Peoria in 1859, where he established a restaurant. He moved to Lacon in 1851 and went into the manufacture of cigars, and in 1862 moved to LaSalle. where he carried on the cigar business tor two years, and the turning business which is his trade for four years, and in 1867 located in Wenona in a saloon, which he sold out in 1869 and started a grocery. In '71 he moved to Troy Grove, where he carried on a grocery and dry goods business one year, then went to Chicago, and back to LaSalle, returning to Wenona in 1874, when he started in the saloon again, which he discontinued in 1878, and opened a restaurant. He married Mary E. GERLACH in 1869. She was born Germany. They have five children - Amelia, Rosetta, Hermena, Jennetta and Betta. He is a member of the I. O. O. F.

Milton BAYNE

Mr. BAYNE (of Bayne & Son) was born in Brown county, Ohio, in 1831, came west and located in Woodford county in 1854, then to LaSalle, near Tonica, the following spring, and to Low Point, in Livingston county, in 1862, where he followed farming, and in 1866 went to LaSalle county, near Wenona. He moved into the village about 1872. He married Miss Nancy A. CARSON in 1851, who was born in Adams county, Ohio. They have four children - James L., William M., Louis M. and Charlie D. He has been identified with the Canton Wrought Iron Bridge Co. since 1869. He sold over 65 spans in LaSalle county, valued at about $180,000, and in Livingston county about 50 spans, valued at about $40,000, besides other counties, which would amount in valuation to $100,000, or $320,000 on all. He is energetic in the pursuit of business, and the bridges he puts up are of the most substantial kind, He is a genial companion and a good talker, as well as just the man for the place.

A. H. FOWLER

Mr. FOWLER was born in Worcester county, Mass., in 1832. He came west in 1850, and located in Putnam county, then moved to Buchanan, Iowa, and returned to Illinois in 1857, and located in Wenona He enlisted in Co. H. 104th Ill. Vol., and was promoted to commissary sargeant in 1862, and served to the close of the war. He made the march with Sherman to the sea, mustered out in Chicago, and returned to Wenona in 1865, when he commenced his present business. He married Sarah K. MULKINS in 1865. She was born in Otsego county, N. Y. They have three children - Emma S., Orie E. and Pauline E. He has been in the grain business since 1865. His place is at Garfield, LaSalle county, where he has an elevator of 25,000 bushels capacity, and one in Wenona of 15,000 capacity He handles 200 000 bushels annually, and likewise deals in coal.

William HUWALD

Mr. HUWALD was born in Halstine, Germany, in 1845, came to the United States in 1865, located at Chicago and worked at his trade until 1867. He then moved to Ottawa and lived there until 1877, when he located at Wenona and established his present business, that of a wagon and carriage maker and blacksmith shop. He married Johanna SEPPEL in 1871, born in Saxony, Germany, and they have two children - Charlie and Edward. He is a member of the I. O. O. F. He manufactures all kinds of carriages, buggies, and wagons, and does a general blacksmithing and repairing business.

Nathaniel MOORE

Mr. MOORE was born in Warren county, Ohio, in 1819. His father was a merchant and moved to Preble county, when he was only a few months old, where he lived some six years, and then moved to Kokomo, Ind., where be located in 1851. In 1853 he moved back to Preble county, and engaged in farming, which be continued until 1855, when he moved to Wenona and opened a general store with a Mr. NEWBERN, as Moore & Newbern. He engaged also in shipping grain. At the end of a year he sold to S. J. TAYLOR his interest in the store, but continued in the grain trade. He owned a couple of farms, upon one of which he moved in the spring of 1857, and farmed it some six years. He then purchased his fine farm of 200 acres, adjoining Wenona, which he improved and moved to in the spring of 1863. This is his home farm, to which he has added good home-like buildings, his residence being the very picture of comfort, snugly hid away in the midst of a fine grove of trees of his own planting. His barns and out buildings are in accordance with the general appearance of the rest of the group. Then the towering wheel of the wind-mill which supplies water to his house and farm, with its well defined form peeping out over the tree tops, gives the whole place a rich and romantic appearance. He married Julia BANTA in the fall of 1843 born in Preble county, Ohio. They have six children living - George H., J. M. W., Edward E., Mary Francis, A. B. and Willis. Mrs. MOORE is a member of the M. E. church. He was elected sheriff in 1864 and served two years. He was supervisor of the township several years, and was a member of the 28th and 29th General Assemblies of the Ill. legislature. He was chosen executor in the settlement of the estate of Solomon WISE in 1862, and assignee of J. A. McCall & Co., bankers in 1878, He is still engaged in the latter. He is school director, and has filled nearly all the local offices of his district. His father, David MOORE, now in his 92d year, finds a comfortable home at his house.

Francis M. MYERS

Mr. MYERS is a well known fruit grower and breeder of short horn cattle, and son of David MYERS. He was born in Roberts township in 1835, obtained his education at the University of Galesburg, taught school in various places, and took charge of his father's nursery. Mr. MYERS, Sr., planted the first nursery put out in the county and is well known all over this part of the state. The subject of this sketch was married to Celia McMORRIS in 1860, a native of Zanesville, Ohio. They have one daughter, a promising young lady, their only living child. He purchased the nucleus of his present farm, 40 acres, in 1860 and commenced improvements, moving on to it in 1862. His first planting was five bushels of apple seeds, gathered by himself, and now grown into fine orchards. Soon after he added to his farm until he has, in the immediate vicinity of Wenona, a well equipped stock and fruit farm of nearly 200 acres. He is gradually drifting out of the nursery business into the more profitable and congenial business, to him, of raising fine stock and fruits. He has 8 acres in strawberries and 25 acres in orchard, with some 45 varieties of apples, besides pears, cherries, etc. He took the first premium for the greatest variety of apples exhibited by one exhibitor at the fair of Wenona. Also other premiums, including the sweepstakes for the greatest variety of fruits exhibited. The total value of the prizes was over $50. He has taken these prizes for the last three years. He also took the first premium, of $100, for the best grass herd exhibited at the fair. He has now 26 bead of short horn cattle on his farm besides other stock. Mr. Myers has been a local preacher in the M. E. church since 1867, and was regularly ordained by Bishop AYERS, deacon, Sept., 1875. He is a pleasant, genial gentleman, sociable and entertaining, and takes pride in his occupation. Mrs. M. is equally endowed with the qualifications necessary to fulfill her part in the circle in which she moves.

Johnson BROWN

Mr. BROWN was born in Fayette county, Pa., in 1822 and came to Putnam county in 1842, and to Wenona in 1865. He married Miss Augusta A. RENIFF in 1853, born in Massachusetts. Their children are Clarence H., Lillian E., Joslin and Sherman J. They are members of the Presbyterian church. His oldest son, Clarence K. was the first white child born in Wenona, and he himself was the first justice of the peace, which position he filled about 8 years, and served as assessor and collector two years of each. His wife has kept a millinery establishment since 1864. S. BROWN, his brother, who keeps a livery stable in Wenona, served in the army in company H. 104th Ill. Volunteers, having enlisted in 1862, and served to the close of the war. He is alderman in the 2d ward. Is serving his second term.

Mrs. Mary SIMONSON

Mrs. SIMONSON is the widow of the late Jesse SIMONSON, who died in 1877. Both were natives of Preble county, Ohio, and were married in 1860. Mr. S. was brought up a farmer and followed that occupation here. Five children were given them - William C., Sarah E., Laura F., David M. and Jesse. They are members of the M. E. church. Mrs. SIMONSON owns 160 acres of land under good cultivation.

J. N. WOOD

Mr. WOOD has long been known as a keeper of one of the most popular hotels in the country. He was born in Weston, Pa., 1818 and moved to La Salle county in 1852, to Putnam county 1853 and to Marshall county in 1854. He lived in the township when there was but six houses between the village and his farm, six miles away. In the village there was but a few shanties and the railroad buildings. In 1840 he married Sarah J. GRAY, and four children have been born to them Frances (Mrs. CLARK), William, Nathaniel, Anna M. (Mrs. DECKER), and J. Franklin. Has been in the hotel business here since 1869. During the rebellion he enlisted in the 104th and was elected lieutenant in company H. His oldest son served in the 44th until the close of the war. Mr. WOOD has served as alderman and filled other positions. He is genial and gentlemanly, and keeps a first-class house.

William C. DECKER

Mr. DECKER is a furniture dealer and undertaker, born in Orange county, New York, in 1848. He removed west in 1871. stopping first at Morris, where he had an uncle living. From there he went to Aurora and came to Wenona in 1873 where he succeeded K. A. MOORE and purchased the establishment he has since run. He married Annie WOOD in 1874. Their children are Maud W. and Jesse. He keeps a fine stock of furniture and gives particular attention to undertaking in all its branches.

Hutchinson CROFT (with portrait)

Mr. CROFT was of English parentage on his father's side, and was born in Bucks county, Pa., Sept. 7th, 1828. When about seven years old, his father moved to Clinton County, Ohio, and lived there until 1844. Hutchison showed when a small boy a strong inclination to deal in and handle stock, and for a boy his judgment was remarkably good, the faculty seeming inborn. In 1844 his father and family moved to the east end of Marshall county. Young CROFT was then about 16 years old. They first lived in Evans township, but afterward located in Roberts. The family was poor, and when be arrived at the age of manhood he had nothing to begin life with, and a poor education; but good judgment and an indomitable will enabled him to contend successfully with the disadvantages of poverty. When about 21 years old he married Miss Euphemia BECKWITH, Dec. 22d, 1849. They went to housekeeping in the old log cabin on the BECKWITH farm, where his wife had been raised from infancy. He first took a lease on the widow's dower in the farm, and after accumulating some property he bought the heirs out, and finally acquired full possession of the farm. This place seemed to be headquarters for all his trading operations. After he had been in business a few years, farming and raising stock, he went in partnership with John A. McCALL and David ADAMS in buying and shipping stock to Chicago. Mr. CROFT perhaps bought and shipped more stock to Chicago than any other man in this part of the state, as the firm always relied on his superior judgment. In after years, when business accumulated to such an extent that it was necessary to establish a bank, the firm established the old bank of J. A. McCall & Co., which did a safe business as long as Mr. CROFT remained one of the firm. He accumulated wealth and bought farm after farm until at his death he had the Dent, Beepelle, Loyd, Phillip, and the McCall farms, near Magnolia, in all 1,200 or 1,400 acres of valuable land. Of his children, Samuel, the oldest son, married a daughter of Peter FORBES, and lives on the Beepelle farm; Mary Lovina died Sept. 1st, 1861, and was buried in Cumberland cemetery; Emma married John Kirkpatrick, and is still living on the farm; Julia lately married Clark SINCLAIR, and is also living on the farm; James, the youngest son, lives with Samuel. After Mr. CROFT had accumulated a handsome property, and in the prime of life, he was taken down with the spinal disease, which rendered him helpless and a great sufferer. He was first taken down in June, 1874, and became paralyzed below his vital parts. He had a stretcher constructed, covered with an air bed and mounted on a wagon, and with a driver he traveled in this conveyance about the country, buying stock and doing considerable trading. After he became an invalid he sold out all interest in the bank and dissolved his long-existing partnership with Messrs. McCALL and ADAMS; his friendships grew stronger for his neighbors, and under the ministrations of Rev. Robert TAYLOR, a Cumberland Presbyterian minister, he attached himself to that church, receiving the rites at his own home. He attended services in his invalid wagon, which he would have hauled up to the church window, where he could see and hear the preacher. A short time before he died he sent for his old friend Thomas JUDD and had him draw up his last will and testament dividing his property between his wife and children to the satisfaction of all. He died March 7th, 1878. His remains were enclosed in a metallic case and buried in Cumberland cemetery, on Sandy, where a splendid monument stands to mark the last resting place of a good man.

Bingman SHEPLEY

Mr. SHEPLEY was born in Monroe county, Kentucky, in 1830, and came west in 1831 with his parents, and located in Indiana. He came to Marshall county, Ill., in 1849, when he purchased the north-east 1/4 section of the county of Marshall, and married Miss Jane HUNT in 1853. She was born in Evans township. They have seven children – Frank, William, Isabella and Arabella (twins), Abraham, Maggie and Jennie. Are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian church. He has been school director twelve years, is a member of the local protection company, and was overseer of the roads eight years.

J. M. TUTTLE

Mr. TUTTLE is a farmer, living on section 12. He was born in Fayette county, Pa., in 1848, came west in 1866, and settled in Evans township, Marshall county. Two years later he married Miss Eliza PATTERSON, likewise born in Fayette county, Pa. Their three children are Rolla, Wilbert and Goldie. He served in the army as teamster attached to the 9th Maryland, when only seventeen years of age, and saw much of the " pomp and circumstance," as Shakespeare says, "of glorious war."

M. WHITE

Mr. WHITE is a farmer, living on section 1 in Evans township, with P. O. at Wenona. He was born in Butler county, Pa., in 1829, came west and located in Magnolia, Putnam county, in 1855, and moved on to his present location in Osage township, section 6, LaSalle county, in 1866. He married Miss Sarah MARINER in 1865. She was born in West Virginia. He is a member of the Presbyterian church, and Mrs. WHITE of the Christian church. He is school director, and has been for the last six years.

William DILLMAN

Mr. DILLMAN was born in Brown county, Ohio, in 1828, and came to LaSalle county, in Hope township, in 1845, along with his father. He settled in Evans township in 1849, and married Miss Ann M. GRIFFIN the same year. She was born in Fayette county, Pa. They have eight children living - Fannie, Mary, Ida, Sadie, John, David, (Eva, Ella), Effie and Gertrude. Are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian church. He owns 189 acres, all under cultivation. He enlisted in Co. H. 104th Ill. Vol., in 1862, and was discharged in 1863, through disability. He was captured at Hartsville, Tenn., in 1862, and paroled and exchanged in March, 1863.

Lee Roy JUDD

Mr. JUDD is a farmer, living on section 5, Postoffice, Wenona. He was born in Evans township, Marshall county, in 1849, and married Miss Louisa WILSON in 1867. She was born in Ohio. They have three children – Ellet, Delbert and Roy. He owns half of 145 acres, all under cultivation.

Isaac SPRINGER

The subject of this sketch, son of John and Rebecca SPRINGER, was born in the State of Maryland, May 7, A. D. 1798. When about two years of age he with his parents moved to West Virginia and settled on a farm on Grove Creek Hill, and there remained a few years. He then with his parents moved to Muskingum county, Ohio, and settled near Zanesville. Here he grew up to manhood and learned his trade. He married Miss Elizabeth COWAN in 1822, by whom be had two children, a son and a daughter. The son died in infancy, and the daughter, Mary Ann, is still living and resides in Ohio. He buried his wife in February, 1823. He married Miss Charlotte IJAMS, of Muskingham county, Ohio, in the spring of 1826, by whom he had twelve children, viz., Creighton. Caleb, Martha K, Lewis, Harriet, Milton G., Sarah E., Amelia K., Helen L., Adelia A., William Melville and Clara Emma. Caleb died in childhood, and Martha E. died in January, 1866 leaving a family behind her. All the others are still living and reside in this State. In the fall of 1834 he emigrated to Illinois, and spent the first winter in a cabin where Magnolia is situated, and in the following spring moved on a farm owned by Mr. PARKS, east of Captain Haws', and remained in Putnam county about three years, and then settled in Marshall county, where he resided most of the time until his death, which occurred March 17, A. D. 1853. He was a carpenter by trade and a first-class mechanic. He built several of the largest edifices erected in the county in his time, among which were Fisher's Packing House in Lacon, and Livingston Roberts’ barn at Robert's Point. He was a man of more than ordinary intellect, and endowed with a wonderful memory, so that notwithstanding his early educational advantages were quite limited, he made considerable progress in literary pursuits. He was a good historian, and well read on all the general questions of the day. He was one of the finest mathematicians in the county, being able to solve mentally, almost an incredible short time, all the practicable problems he met with. He obtained an extensive knowledge of law, and was considered superior counsel by those who knew him best. He took a deep interest in the political affairs of the country, and was an ardent whig until the agitation of the question of freedom, which became one of increasing interest to him until his death. He was a public spirited man, always advocating internal improvements, and willing to bear his full share in pushing forward any laudable enterprise. From the early settlement of this State he foresaw in it the grandest commonwealth of the Union, but passed away as he was entering, upon the realization of his fond hopes.

John A. COLESON

Mr. COLESON was born in Woodford county, Ill., in 1857, and is a son of Caleb COLESON now a resident of Eureka, Ill. In 1878 he married Amelia CLARK, likewise born in Woodford county. They have one child, Frank Oscar, and are members of the Christian church. He rents 160 acres of land from his father, which he cultivates. He is a promising young farmer, with an unusual amount of perseverance, and with good health is sure to succeed.

H. C. WOOLF

Mr. WOOLF was born in Muskingum county, Ohio, in 1828, and moved to Marshall county in 1856, when he located in Evans township. In 1866 he married Clara J. KNOWLES, born in Perry county, Ohio. They have four children - Moe, Lucie, Annie and Charlie. They are members of the M. E. church. Mr. WOOLF is road commissioner and treasurer of the board; is also school director. He owns 130 acres of land, in a high state of cultivation. He is now engaged in raising thoroughbred cotswold sheep, having a number now on hand. Mr. Woolf sees the sheep interest of the west is going to be very largely developed, and by making a specialty of this fine breed has laid the foundation of a fortune for himself.

Samuel KREIDER

Mr. KREIDER was born in Washington county, Pa., in 1816, and moved west with his parents in 1835. They settled in Fulton county, where he lived until 1847, whence he moved to Putnam county in 1849, and to Marshall, where he now resides, on the last of December, 1857. In 1844 he married Katherine REED. She was born in Park county, Ind., and died May 26th, 1879, leaving four children - John B., George W., James A. and Wilson E. Mrs. KREIDER's parents came to Knox county in 1836. Mr. KREIDER has been school director 16 years and path master two years. He owns 120 acres of land, and is one of the prosperous farmers of his neighborhood. He feels that he has done his share of hard work, and having secured plenty of means, has concluded to retire from farming and lead an easier life.

Samuel HAMILTON

Mr. HAMILTON was born in Licking county, Ohio, in 1814, and came to the west in 1853, purchasing the Burns farm, in Roberts township, which he sold to his son-in-law, Mr. MYERS, in 1866, and moved to Wenona. In 1835 he married Nancy McMORRIS, born in London countv, Va., in 1811. She died in 1866. Seven children were born to them - Celia in 1837, William in 1840, Lizzie in 1844, John in 1847, Oscar (dead), Frank in 1852, and Roe in 1857. In 1866 he married Mrs. Harriet GRAY (RODMAN), born In Ohio in 1822. They are members of the U. P. church. His son John is state senator from McLean county, and Frank is a teacher.

S. C. BARRETT

Mr. BARRETT is a professor of vocal music and agent for musical merchandise. He was born in Windham Co., Vermont, in 1825, came west in 1854 and located in Putnam county, and in Wenona in 1867. In 1852 he married Miss M. A. GLASIER, a native of the same county as himself. They have four children, Mary E., Mattie A., Cora E, and Newton G. They are members of the Baptist church, and Mr. BARRETT belongs to the Masonic order. He has been engaged in teaching vocal music since 1848, has taught all over this part of the country, and thousands of the singers of this state have been trained under him.

Norman B. JUDD

Mr. JUDD was born in Evans township in 1851, and in 1871 married Charlotte STRATTON, a native of Indiana. They have two children, William O. and Ethel May. He is a member of the State Grange and of the local protection society, and is one of those whole-souled gentlemen who make it pleasant for all around them. He has a most interesting family. Mrs. JUDD is a lady of rare qualifications, possessing great social worth.

Samuel D. CLIFFORD

Mr. CLIFFORD is a farmer by occupation, and resides on section 11. He was born in Harrison county, Ohio, Dec. 21st, 1834, and located in Marshall county in 1853. October 29th, 1863, he married Sarah E. HOYT, who was born in this county. They have four children - Laslie, Anita, Hoyt and James S. Mr. CLIFFORD is school director. He owns 80 acres of land in a good state of cultivation, and has comfortable improvements. He is a pleasant and sociable gentleman.

J. B. SKINNER

This gentleman, a member of the firm of Skinner & Co., tile manufacturers, of Wenona, was born in Preble county, Ohio, in 1833, and came to Wenona in 1877. In 1866 he married Susan FELTON, who was also born in Ohio. They have one child, Anderson. Mrs. SKINNER is a member of the M. E. church. He has been in the tile business since 1877. They manufacture all sizes necessary, and keep them on hand at all times. They are now selling -
2-1/2 inch, $12 per 1,000
3 ", 15 "
3-1/2 ", 18 "
4 ", 20 "
5 ", 30 "
6 ", 40 "
Few farmers fully appreciate the advantage of under drainage. It will pay for all the expenses of tile and labor in the increase of crops, besides rendering the swamp land the most productive.

Isaac P. HOWARD

Mr. HOWARD is a farmer, living on section 12, Evans township, Postoffice. Wenona. He was born in Mount Pleasant, Jefferson county, Ohio, in 1824, and moved to Putnam county in 1851. He married Miss Rebecca WILSON in 1853. She was born in Belmont county, Ohio. They have six children - Mary Ida, Lewella J., Hattie R., Henry W., John M. and Delbert J. Are members of the Quaker church. Mr. Howard has been school director several years. He owns 160 acres of land, all under cultivation, with good improvements. He possesses a generous nature and is a good farmer.

W. M. SPRINGER

Mr. SPRINGER comes from a noted family, and was born in Marshall county in 1849. He married Miss Mary Angeline FEECE in 1877. She was born in Knox county, Ill. They have one child, Frederick R., born May 28, 1878. Mrs. S. is a member of the Congregational church. He is township trustee. He cultivates 250 acres of land, and is a son Of the late Isaac SPRINGER, one of the oldest settlers of this county, an extended notice of whom is given elsewhere. He is engaged in breeding short-horn cattle and Poland China hogs.

Jacob KEMP

Mr. KEMP was born in Fayette county, Pa., in 1821, and came to Marshall county in 1856. He married Miss Sarah PARNELL in 1843. She died in 1852, leaving four children living Nicholas M., Sarah M., Mariana E. and Thomas. He married Miss Catherine BROWN in 1853. She died in 1867, leaving three children James B., Laura and Janette. He married Miss Sarah DILLINNER in 1869. She was born in Green county, Pa. They have four children - Ambrose, Anna Bell, Jacob Ecra and Emma. They are members of the M. E. church. He is a member of the I. O. O. F., also of the temperance society. He owns 80 acres in a good state of cultivation. He was township collector one year, and served as school director twelve years. Never served as a juror, nor gave evidence as a witness, which shows him to be a man of peace.

William EVANS

Mr. EVANS was born in Licking county, Ohio, December 31st, 1817, and came to this county (then Tazewell) with his parents in the full of 1830. In 1849 he married Martha SPRINGER, who was born in Muskingum county, O., and four children have been given them, viz.: Elizabeth, Douglas, John F. and Lucy. Mrs. EVANS died in 1866. Are members of M. E. church. He was justice of the peace some seven years, served as school trustee some 25 years, and filled other local offices. He owns 320 acres of land, all improved, with good buildings. He is the oldest living settler in the township of Evans. A more extended notice of the family is given elsewhere.

Michael MARTIN

Mr. MARTIN was born in County Cavan, Ireland, in 1826, and came to the United States in 1847. He married Miss Bridget McDONALD in 1857. She was born in the same county in Ireland. They have no children. Are members of the Catholic church. He owns 160 acres of land in a good state of cultivation and good improvements; is hard-working and knows how to make money.

J. FRAZEE

Farmer. Section 27. Postoffice, Wenona.

Richard BURROUGHS

Mr. BURROUGHS was born in County Kilkenny, Ireland, in 1820, came to the United states in 1852, and located in the New York, where he lived eleven years. In 1861 he determined to go west, and came to Marshall county Illinois. He married Johanna QUINN in 1846. She was a native of the same place. She died March 27, 1879, leaving three children – Margaret, Edward and Mary Ann. They are Catholics. He owns 160 acres of land, and is a good substantial farmer. Mr. B. is indebted to his own industry for his success. He has rained a family of intelligent boys and girls, is proud of his adopted country, and deserves his good fortune.

Zera P. BECKWITH

Mr. BECKWITH was born in Madison county, N. Y., in 1815. He came to Indiana with his parents the following year, and lived there until 1835, helping to clear up and open a farm. In the year above named he came to Marshall county, and in 1887 married Mary A. GAYLORD, a native of Pennsylvania. They have five children, - Putnam, Albert, Orin, Emma (BALL), and Clara. They are members of the Christian church. Mr. BECKWITH was justice of the peace four years, school director and constable eight years. He owns 170 acres, all under cultivation. He enlisted in Co. H. 104th Ill. Inf. in 1862, as musician, and served until 1863, when he was mustered out, owing to disability contracted in the service. He lost one son, Leondias, who died of disease in the army. His oldest living son, Putnam, served until the close of the war. Was wounded at Lexington, Mo., in 1861, and captured there with Col. James A. MULLIGAN. When exchanged he re-entered the service.

Robert HENRY

Mr. HENRY is a large farmer, living on section 29, Evans township. Postoffice, Wenona. He was born in Westmoreland county, Pa., in 1816, and moved to Ohio with his parents in 1820. They located in Harrison county, where he lived until 1843, and then went back to Washington county, Pa. He came to Marshall county, Ill., Dec., 1851. He married Mary HATHAWAY in 1863, a native of Kentucky. She had two children by a former marriage - David L. and William A. SMITH. Mr. HENRY is a member of the U. P. church. She is a member of the Christian church. He was assessor and road commissioner several years. He owns 166 acres of land, all in a good state of cultivation.

Joseph REYNOLDS

Mr. REYNOLDS was born in Franklin county, Mass., in 1834, and located in Putnam county. Ill., in 1845. He moved to Marshall county in 1858, and married Miss Emily ANDERSON the same year. She was born also in Franklin county, Mass. They have two children - Charles A., 16; and Ella May, 8. He is a member of the I. O. O. F., and is engaged in the purchase and sale of grain, hogs, cattle, etc., of which he handles large quantities. His elevator at Evans has a capacity of 8,000 bushels. Shipments are made to Chicago.

Andrew J. BISHOP

Mr. BISHOP was born in Washington county, Pa., in 1830, and came west in 1853, locating first in Putnam Co., where he married Eliza J CHAMP the same year. She was born in Hennepin. They have 4 children - Charles W., Mary E., Lydia L. and Lyman H. They are members of M. E. church. He has been school director some eight years, and owns eighty acres of land under good cultivation, and with good improvements.

Edward CLIFFORD

Mr. CLIFFORD was born in Brook county, Virginia, in 1806. He moved to Harrison county, Ohio, with his parents in 1811, and married Miss Rebecca DUNLAP in 1831. She was born in Harrison county, Ohio, in 1807. They have six children living - Sarah (Mrs. PHILLIP), Nancy, Samuel D., Martha J. (Mrs. DUNLAP), Margaret and Susan (Mrs. HAMILTON). Are members of the U. P. church. He was road commissioner six years. He owns 336 acres in his homestead, all improved. Mr. CLIFFORD was an early settler in the township, and by his own exertions has grown to wealth and the possessorsbip of one of the finest farms in the township.

John ALGER

Mr. ALGER is a farmer living on section 32. He was born in county Donegal, Ireland, in 1826, and came to the United States in 1846, locating in Marshall county. He married Miss Ann BOYD in 1856, a native of the same county in Ireland as himself. They have two children, George and Martha J. They are members of the U. P. church. He owns 80 acres of land in a high state of cultivation, and is a public-spirited, liberal man.

F. H. HOLETON

Mr. HOLETON was born in Muskingum county, Ohio, in 1819, and located in this county in 1857. He married Hannah COCKEREL previous to coming to this county. She was born in London county, Va. They have two children, James W. and George H. Are members of the M. E. church. He has been road commissioner and school trustee, and was postmaster at Evans station nearly two years. Mr. HOLETON owns a very fine property near the station, and his farm in one of the best on the prairie. He is well posted in all the affairs of the day, has a plenty of this world's goods, and takes the world easy. One of his sons is publisher of the Chillicothe Review.

Joshua EVANS

Mr. EVANS was born in London county, Virginia, Jan. 5th, 1793. When he was about eight years old, his father, Thomas EVANS, died, leaving his mother, Rhoda, a widow with eight children - six sons and two daughters, the eldest of whom was not over sixteen years old. A tract of land was owned by the family, but very little had been done in the way of clearing off the heavy timber that covered it, and when cleared the soil was sterile. In 1803 the widow abandoned the Virginia home, not having bee liable to effect any sale, and removed with her family to Licking county, Ohio. At the age of 19 Joshua enlisted in the army and served in the war of 1812-13. He belonged to the regiment commanded by Lewis Cass and during the latter part of the war served as quartermaster. He was among the unfortunate victims of Gen. Hull's treacherous and cowardly surrender, and could never refer to that incident of the war without expressing his indignation. In 1816 he was married to Elizibeth RADCLIFF, by whom he had three sons and six daughters . His three sons, William, Albert and Rev. J. G., are still living, and now reside in Evans township. Three of the daughters grew to womanhood and are still living. The eldest, Mrs. ALEXANDER, resides in Magnolia, Putnam county, one in Nebraska, and the third in Michigan. In 1824 Mr. EVANS joined the M. E. church of which he remained a member until his death, and most of the time held some official relation in the church. In 1830 he removed to Illinois and settled at Cherry Point, then in La Salle county. His undoubted and unquestionable veracity won the confidence of his neighbors among whom he always maintained a high standing. He had no advantages for an education, his entire school privileges extending through only a part of one winter. He was, however, a man of very sound judgment and was very accurate in his business. His memory was unusually good, and he read men so readily that he was not often deceived. He was industrious and economical, and was among the best of the early farmers in Evans township. He settled at Cherry Point because he thought the prairies around the grove would not be settled for many generations and his descendents could have ample range for their stock, but he lived to see every quarter section for many miles from his residence occupied. He was very accommodating to those who bethought deserved help, and determined that question wholly by the answer to two inquiries. Is he honest? Will he work? If he thought a man to be lazy or dishonest he would give him neither sympathy nor assistance in any way, but if he believed him honest and industrious he was always ready to accommodate. He was for many years before his death the oldest settler in the township and was honored as such by his neighbors. In 1860 when the township organization in Marshall county was effected, the people at a public meeting, chose the name of Evans for the town as a compliment to him. In politics he was an ardent whig and usually took an active interest in the political campaigns. He was one of the delegates from Marshall county to the senatorial convention at which Robert BOAL was nominated for the state senate. When the Whig party was abandoned he became a Republican and voted that ticket until his death. He was widely and favorably known among the early settlers of this and surrounding counties. In 1853 Mr. EVANS married Mrs. Elizabeth JONES, by whom he had one child, now Mrs. BROWN, a resident of this township. He died January 15th, 1869.

William TRIMBLE

Mr. TRIMBLE is a well to do farmer, who was born in Fayette county, Pa., in 1839. He came to this county less than one year ago and commenced housekeeping, having just married Dalinda HILL. She was born in Pennsylvania. He owns 80 acres of excellent farming land.

William S. WOOD

Farmer, La Salle county, postoffice, Wenona, Ill.

Levi M. QUAINTANCE

Mr. QUAINTANCE is a farmer living on section 2. Postoffice, Wenona. He was born in Coester county, Pa., in 1818, came west in 1864 and located first in Magnolia, Putnam county, and in this county in 1861. In 1844 he married Catherine BREM, born in Maryland. They have three children living - Thomas D., Sarah J. and Levi Watson, and two deceased. They are members of the M. E. church. He was school director eight years. He owns 113 acres of land, all under cultivation.

Edwin GANTS

Mr. GANTS is a son of Nathaniel and Nancy GANTS. The latter is a sister of the well known Judd Bros., of Evans township. Nathaniel GANTS was born in Pennsylvania Jan. 17th, 1820, came to Illinois in 1844, and was married Dec. 31st, 1847. They have four children - Thomas, born May 19, 1849; Edwin, born Nov. 14, 1850; Emma, born March 19, 1854; and Preston, born July 29, 1856. Edwin lives in Evans township, and in April, 1879, married May DISOSWAY, born in Virginia. They have one child, Mark Edwin. Mr. GANTS is a member of the Masonic order, and owns 100 acres of land. Nathaniel GANTS died Feb. 21, 1860. Emma died Sept. 27, 1857.

William H. PARKINSON

Mr. PARKINSON was born in Licking county, O., in 1841. He came to La Salle county, Ill., in 1856, and to Marshall county in 1864. He married Isabella GIBSON, born in Marshall county, in 1866. They have four children - Lucy J., James W., Edgar and Mary. Mr. PARKINSON is a fair representative of the gentleman farmer class of Marshall and Putnam counties, both in appearance and intelligence, which in above the average of other states. He owns 160 acres of land, all under cultivation.

Benjamin WILSON

Mr. WILSON was born in Franklin county in 1826, and came west in 1836 and located with his parents in Cherry Grove, Belle Plain township, Marshall county. Here his father purchased a farm upon which there was an old log hut with the roof partially off and grass growing on the floor. They lived in it ten years. His father loaned out money to his neighbors that year, and the hard turns of 1837 coming on, be could not get it back, to build. Benjamin married Margaret A. CUNNINGHAM in 1855, a native of Fayette county, Ohio. They have three children, - S. Thomas, George E. and William H. They are consistent members of the M. E. church. Mr. WILSON was justice of the peace 20 years in Belle Plain, also school director and trustee several years, He owns 320 acres of land in Ford county and 150 acres in Vermillion county, all in a good state of cultivation. He is a pleasant, sociable gentleman, and a good friend and neighbor.

Rev. Jarvice G. EVANS, A. M.

Mr. EVANS, pastor of the M. E. church at Wenona, was born in Evans township, Marshall county, Dec. 19, 1833, and received his education at the Peoria Wesleyan Seminary, Judson College, Mt. Palatine, and at the Ohio Wesleyan University, and received his degree of A. M. from Quincy College in 1870. He commenced preaching in 1854. Continued in the pastorate until 1872, and was then elected president of Hedding College, at Abingdon, Ill., and in 1878 was elected president of Chaddock College, Quincy. He resigned during the year and returned to the pastorate. He married Nettie GARDNER June 14, 1857, born in Delaware county, Ohio. The have one child living, Ida, and one son deceased. Miss EVANS is now a teacher of Latin in the Streator high school. She is a graduate of Bedding College. He has published a number of lectures and sermons in pamphlet form, including 'Pulpit and Politics," "Tobacco," “Thanksgiving Discourse," "Funeral Sermon of Lincoln," and several others. He has served as secretary of Central Ill. annual Conference for several years, and was, in 1876, a delegate to the General Conference, Baltimore.

August APPLETON

Mr. APPLETON is a farmer living in Evans township, section 35, and was born in Sweden in 1846, came to the United States in 1868, and located in Putnam county, where he married Matilda COLSON in 1879. She was born in Sweden. He rents 160 acres. Like most of his countrymen Mr. APPLETON is a good farmer, industrious and hard working. These are the elements of success and lead to riches and honor.

Porter MOORE

Mr. MOORE was born in Brown county, Ohio, 1846 and came to La Salle county in 1856 with his parents. Married Martha GRIMES in 1867, born in Indiana. They have six children - Bessie L., Maud May, Kittie, Fletcher P., Mattie and Edna. Are members of the M. E. church. He is a member of the Grange. He has been in the short horn cattle business for the last ten years, and is now engaged in raising Holstein stock, the only one in this section of the country. He also carries on a meat market in Wenona. The Holstein breed have many points of excellence and are destined to become great favorites and in corresponding demand.

Francis H. BOND

Mr. BOND was born in Worcester county, Mass., in 1821 and came west in 1848 where he became a very successful teacher. Choosing law as a profession he qualified himself for its practice, and was admitted to the bar in 1861, and has followed it successfully ever since. He married Lucy BROADDUS in 1848, born in Virginia. They have had one child which no longer survives. Mr. BOND has been city attorney, town clerk, and served as justice of the peace for many years. He is likewise real estate agent and can give valuable information to buyers or sellers.

Henry WINTER

Mr. WINTER is a farmer living on section 17, Evans township, and was born in Ottawa, La Salle county, Ill., in 1856. Moved to this county in 1877 and married Florence WILSON Feb. 9, 1879. She was born in 1858 on the farm she is now occupying with her husband. He is a very industrious young man, possessed of all the vim and go-ahead-ativeness required to make him a successful man of the world. Commencing early in life, he and his young wife have bright prospects before them. May they continue to brighten. While providing for the wants of the body he does not neglect the mind.

Robert MANN

Mr. MANN was born in Roxburyshire, Scotland, in 1846, and came to the United States when 20 years old and located in this township. He married Anna ALEXANDER in 1870, born in the house she is now living in. They have two children – Wilbur and Isabella. He is a member of the Masonic order. He is engaged in breeding short horn cattle of superior grades, and fine horses. He owns the celebrated horse, Silver Wave, bred in Kentucky and said to be the finest roadster in Marshall county. He runs his farm exclusively as a stock farm, known as the "old Fort stock farm." His cattle are all sired by thoroughbred bulls. His farm is the site of the old fort.

Austin C. GARVIN

Mr. GARVIN was born in Monroe county, Indiana, October 4, 1815, and moved to Putnam county in 1849, with his mother. He married Eliza SIMMONS in 1868, born in Maryland. They have three children - Clara E., Bertha and Austin C. He is school director, and owns 17 acres of land which he cultivates in good style. Mr. GARVIN is a gentleman whom it is a pleasure to meet. He is kind, hospitable and courteous.

David M. HALL

Mr. HALL is a farmer living on sections 2 and 11, Evans township. Postoffice. Wenona, Ill. He was born in Fayette county, Pa., in 1837, and located in this county in 1861. Married Elizabeth SMITH in 1866, born in the same county. She died in 1868 leaving two children, Robert and Will Emmett. He married his present wife, Augusta JONES, in 1869, born in this county. Four children have been born to them - Susie, Kittie, Josie and Rubby. He owns 248 acres, all under cultivation. His wife's father, Mr. D. JONES, is one of the oldest settlers of this county.

G. W. GRAY

Mr. GRAY was born in Muskingum county, near Zanesville, Ohio, in 1817, and came to Illinois and located in Putnam county, near Magnolia, in 1845, where he engaged in farming. He married Miss Juliann WILBER, Feb. 4. 1837. She was born in Connecticut, and died July 12, 1877. They had five children - Thomas Ligget, died in the army from disease contracted there, Ageline, George W. Jr., William H. Charles, Wesley and Mary R. His present wife, Elizabeth CONARD, was born in Licking county, Ohio, in 1833. They were married in May, 1878. Are members of the M. E. church. He was assessor in Groveland township, LaSalle county, the first time it was assessed; was school director and trustee several terms. He is steward of his church, and has been a member some 40 years. Mrs. GRAY has also been a member of the M. E. church since childhood.

A. BECKWORTH

Mr. BECKWORTH was born in Onondaga county, New York, in 1812. He came west with his parents and located in Dearborn county, Indiana, in 1816, and came to this county in 1835. He learned the trade of bricklaying and plastering in Cincinnati in 1832, and worked at it up to 1859, when he engaged in farming in Stephens township. He married Miss Margaret GILMORE in 1861, born in Fayette county, Pa., in 1840. They have three children living - Otto Q., Orson E. and Omar S. Are members of the Christian church. They moved into Wenona in 1869. He owns 400 acres of land in Livingston county, under good cultivation, and has a residence in Wenona.

Thomas REILLY

Mr. REILLY was born in County Cavan, Ireland, in 1827. He removed to England in 1847, and came to the United States in 1862, settling in this county. In 1861 he married Mary MARTIN, from his native place, who died in 1869, leaving him three children. In 1870 he married Miss Maggie BREESE. She was born in County Kerry, Ireland. They have four children - Annie, Thomas, Henry and Maggie, and by his first wife Katie, John and Mattie. Are members of the Catholic church. He has been school director for the last ten years, and owns 240 acres, all under cultivation.

Edward S. GOULD

Mr. GOULD was born in the State of New York in 1832, his parents moving to Detroit when he was five years old, where he obtained an education, and he became a bricklayer. In 1852 he wedded Lotta CASTELLO, also born in New York, who bore him one child, Ella E., born December 5, 1853. This daughter grew up and wedded William H. PARRETT. They have one child and its name is Bessie. Mr. GOULD is a member of the Masonic order.

Charles H. TURNER

Mr. TURNER was born in Fayette county, Pa., and came west in 1868. He first located in Clay county, Ill., and moved to LaSalle county in 1859. He married Sarah J. QUAINTANCE in 1869. She was born in Pennsylvania. They have three children - John W., Hattie and Irene. Are members of the M. E. church. He is a good and industrious farmer working on rented land.

Alfred JUDD

Mr. JUDD is a farmer (bachelor), living on section 6. Postoffice, Wenona. He was born in North Carolina in 1822. He came to this county (then Putnam) in 1831, with his parents. After his father's death, his devotion to his widowed mother bound him to her whilst she lived, to whom he gave his undivided attention up to the time of her death, a few months ago. Hence he has never married, he owns 725 acres of land in a prosperous state of cultivation. He is a pleasant, social gentleman.

Mrs. Gilley COWEN

Mrs. COWEN is widow of William COWEN, who was born near Hagerstown, Md., in 1798, and emigrated to Ohio at an early day. He died in 1863. 8he was born in Monongabela county, Va., in 1806, moved with her parents to Ohio in 1808, and married in 1824. She has had seven children - Hermil, Cynthia (Mrs. LETTS), Minerva, (deceased), Lucinda (Mrs. MORSE), Robert A., Isabella (deceased), Theresa and Zilpha, Malvina (Mrs. STEVENSON), William, Delbert and John (deceased). They are members of the M. E church. Mrs. COWEN comes from the DENTs, and is a cousin of John O. DENT. They moved to Putnam county in 1831. During the Black Hawk war Mr. COWEN was a soldier under Colonel STRAWN.

F. A. PACKINGHAM

Mr. PACKINGHAM was born in Wayne county, Pa., in 1888, and began business as a merchant at Evans in 1876. He married Nancy BURGESS in 1877, born in Connecticut. They attend the M. E. church. He was appointed postmaster in 1876, express agent in 1877, and station agent in 1879. He enlisted in company F. 63d Ill. Volunteers in 1862 and served until mustered out at Springfield, Ill., in 1866. He was detailed in the Military Telegraph Corps as mounted orderly during 1864-6.

David MOORE

Mr. MOORE was born in New Jersey in 1813, and came to Ohio with his parents when two years old. He married Anna BORRADAIL in 1836, born near Bennington, N. J. They had five children - Rebecca B. (deceased), Arthur, (deceased), Mary, Elizabeth (McADAMS), Martha T. (deceased), and Anna. Arthur was a member of Capt. Vaughn's company and died at Bolivar, Tenn., in 1863. He was a good soldier and much respected. Mr. MOORE owns 206 acres of well improved land.

Mrs. Lucy GIBSON (widow)

Mrs. GIBSON (GAYLORD) was born in Bradford county, Pa., in 1803 and came to this township, then a part of La Salle county, in 1881, removing to her present homestead in 1833 or 1834. She married George MARTIN in 1833, a native of Connecticut, who located in this neighborhood in 1830. He died in 1838 leaving two children - Aaron G. and Sylvia A. (KIRKPATRICK). She married her second husband, James GIBSON, in 1842. He was born in Fifshire, Scotland. He died in 1855 leaving two children - Isabel and James. Mrs. KIRKPATRICK's husband died in 1862 in the army, of disease contracted there. Mrs. GIBSON has 200 acres of land, all under cultivation. She is believed to be the oldest settler in Evans township. She remembers when the family were notified to pack up and getaway from the Indians during the Black Hawk war. Lemuel GAYLORD, her father, was one of the Revolutionary soldiers, and was at the surrender of Cornwallis. He was retained in the service for a year after the close of the Revolution. He helped to haul away the cannon captured from the British army. He died at the age of 89 years and was buried in the Cumberland cemetery near the house of Mrs. GIBSON in this township.

C. P. MORGAN

Mr. MORGAN was born in Clermont county, Ohio, in 1831, and removed west in 1853, and located in La Salle county where he lived until 1866 and then came to Evans township. He married America DILLMAN in 1855. She was born in Gallia county, Ohio, and they have eight children - Mary E., Adeline, Mattie, Jesse, Frank, Marcus P., America and Clara. He is a member of the Masonic order and of the Grange. He has been school director six years and owns 160 acres of land, all under cultivation, with good buildings.

William T. HAMILTON

Mr. HAMILTON was born in Union county, O., in 1840, and came to Marshall county in 1854, residing in Roberts township with his parents on the Burns farm and in Evans township until 1867. He married Susan CLIFFORD in 1862. She was born in Harrison county, Ohio. They have four children - Luetta, John F., James E. and Samuel O. Are members of the Presbyterian church. He is an elder in the church. He served two years as sheriff pro tem, filling the place with entire acceptability. He is directing his attention to raising graded cattle, Cotswold sheep and fine horses.

Benjamin F. TURNER

Mr. TURNER lives on section 21, Evans township, and was born in Muskingum county, Ohio, in 1825. He came to Magnolia in the spring of 1845 and purchased his present farm in 1856. He married Hannah L. MILLER in 1850, born in Stubenville, Ohio, 1830. They have six children - William E., born Sept. l, 1851, Martin M. Dec. 8, 1853, Arthur L., March 22, 1856, Charles M., Oct, 27, 1860, Huldah J., July 6, 1863, Estella M., May 17, 1870. Are members of the M. E. church. He has 240 acres in a high state of cultivation, with very pleasant residence and tasty surroundings.

Charles CUSAC

Mr. CUSAC was born in Muskingum county, Ohio, in 1838, and came to Illinois in 1858, finding a home in this county, and lived three years, and then returned to Ohio. He came back to Marshall county in 1865, returned to Ohio in again in 1866, and once more came to Illinois in 1874. He married Miss L. J. SMITH in 1861 born in Ohio, same county. He has seven children, William H., Charles A., Louis S., U. S. Grant, James J., Minnie E. and Estella. He cultivates 160 acres of land. In 1863 made a trip to California, returning the following year.

James JENKINS

Mr. JENKINS was born in Butler county, Ohio, in 1824, and came to Marshall county in 1855. He married Elizabeth REEVES in 1847 in Indiana. She was born in Cleveland, Ohio, in 1828. They have six children - Albert W., Clara B., Lilly M., Rosland, Frank E. and E. O., and three deceased. Mrs. JENKINS is a member of the Baptist church. He owns 208 acres of land in Evans and 170 acres in Roberts township, all in cultivation. He is one of the best of farmers, and respected by all who know him.

A. G. EVERLEY

Mr. EVERLEY was born in Mongahela county, Va., in 1837. Came west in 1868, and located in Wenona. He enlisted in the 3d West Virginia cavalry in August, 1862, and served until 1865, when he was mustered out at Wheeling, West Virginia. Married Miss Carrie DILLINER in 1860. She was born in Queen county, Pa. They have four children, - Wordan D., Mary F., Reason A. and Sarah Ann. He is a member of the M. E. church. He cultivates 160 acres of land.

Aaron AXLINE

Mr. AXLINE was born in London county, Va., in 1813. His father removed to Muskingum county, O., in 1826, when he was only 13 years old. Came to this county in 1854. In 1842 he married Miss Ann STREET, who was born in Muskingum county, O. They have seven children, - John W., Catherine S., Theodore, Clara A., Daniel, Mary E. and Clarence A. Are members of the M. E. church. He has been school director six years. He and his whole family are members of the temperance society. He owns 336 acres of land, all improved, with good buildings. Few old families show a fairer record. Mr. E. is deservedly proud of his intelligent sons and daughters.

Abram ALLEN

Mr. ALLEN was born in New York City in 1823. Came west with his uncle, and landed at Quincy in 1835, living in Adams county until 1850, when he went to California and remained about two years. He came where he now resides in 1853. He married Miss Cecilia M. CROSS in 1867. She was born in Pennsylvania, and when two years old came to Dixon, having made the trip from Pennsylvania in a one-horse wagon. Her father was a minister in the Baptist church. They moved to Rutland in 1860. They have three children, - Charles A., Grace M. and Mary K. Are members of the M. E. church. He has been school director several years, is clerk of the board, and trustee of the M. E. church. Miss Amelia ALLEN is residing with her brother. He owns 360 acres of land, all improved. He was in Evans before the I C. R. R. was in operation. There were no houses in Wenona when he came there only the railroad company houses. His farm was run for several years without fences.

Elizabeth EVANS

Mrs. EVANS was born in Granville county. North Carolina, in 1810. Removed to Illinois in 1843, and to this county in 1846. She married Mr. Justus JONES in that year, who died in 1849, leaving one child, Augusta. She married Mr. Joshua EVANS in 1852, who died in January, 1868, leaving her with one child, Frances. She has been a member of the M. E church for over 52 years. Mrs. EVANS is now 69 years of age, yet is smart and active, and in the possession of all her faculties. A lengthy biography of her husband is given elsewhere.

S. C. GRIFFIN

Mr. GRIFFIN was born in Fayette county, Pa., in 1853 and came to this state in 1865. He married Miss Isabella CUSAC in 1877 - born in this county. They have one child, Lena May. Are members of the M. E. church. He is a member of the patrons of husbandry and of the temperance society. He cultivates 50 acres of land. Comes from a family noted for their ability to make money, and is bound to get along.

T. D. QUAINTANCE

Mr. QUAINTANCE is a farmer, living on section 10. He was born in Chester county, Pa., in 1846, and came west with his parents in 1855, first locating in Putnam county (Magnolia), and in this county in 1851. He married Anna McADAMS in 1874. She was born in Harrison county, Ohio. They have two children Jessie and Edna, and are members of the M. E. church. Mr. Q. is a member of the temperance society. He cultivates 216 acres of land.

Aaron G. MARTIN

Mr. MARTIN was born in Caledonia, Putnam county, Ill., in December, 1835, and came on to the farm he at present occupies when but a child. He married Sarah PARKINSON in February, 1863. She was born in Licking
county, Ohio, and has brought him three children living - Harry G., Edwin P. and Helen S., and one child deceased. He is a member of the Masonic order. Mr. MARTIN is school director of district No. 3, and is secretary of the board. He owns 360 acres of well improved land.

Putnam BECKWITH

Mr. BECKWITH was born in Marshall county, Ill., in 1842. He married Miss Francis DAGAN in 1869. She was born in Franklin county, Ohio. They have four children - Bertha M., Herbert H., Charles P. and Mary. He is first lieutenant of Co. B. 10th Bat'l I. N. G. Enlisted in the 1st Ill. Cavalry July 3, 1861, and was discharged July 14, 1862. He enlisted in 14th Cavalry, September 4, 1862; discharged July 30, 1865. He was wounded at Lexington, Mo., twice, in a charge to recover a cannon that was captured by the enemy, and at West Plains, Mo., in May, 1862. He still carries the ball in his body . He was on the Morgan and Stoneman raids, and in many other engagements. He also assisted at the capture of Indians who were in the rebel army - when they released the chief and medicine man and sent them back only to return and fight us again.

Albert EVANS

Mr. EVANS was born in Licking county. Ohio, Dec. 21, 1827, and came to Putnam county in the fall of 1830 with his parents. The township was named after his father. He married Miss Harriet SPRINGER in 1856. She was born in Putnam county. They have six children living, - Winslow, Ella, Lincoln P., Charles E., Charlotte Bell and Ada. They are members of the M. E. church. He was justice of the peace ten years, assessor seven years, and has been township treasurer twenty-six years. He owns 223 acres of land, all improved. He was in the lumber business for awhile in Wenona.

H. R. GRIFFIN

Mr. GRIFFIN was born in Fayette county, Pa., in 1823, and came west and located in this county in 1865. He married Nancy CASSADY in 1851. She was born in the same neighborhood in Pennsylvania as himself, in 1822. They have six children, - Mary E., Ann M., George W., Rebecca S., James L. and John D., and are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian church. He owns 320 acres of land, all under cultivation. Miss Sally MOATS, who has been in his father's family since a girl, is now 75 years old, and is kindly provided for by him, in compliance with his father's will.

Dr. Cornelius PERRY

Dr. PERRY was born in Connecticut in 1823. He studied medicine in Litchfield, and graduated from the New York Medical University in 1846, and settled in Hope, New Jersey, where he practiced medicine for some seven years, and married Lucy M. SWAYZE, a native of New Jersey in 1848. Two children have been born to them Frances and Evelyn. When he first came west he settled in Lacon, where he lived three years, and then moved to Evans township, where he had made extensive purchases of real estate. His wife disliking the prairie, he removed to Chicago, where he remained until 1869, their home being shared this time by the parents of Mrs. P., she being their only child. After going on to the prairie the Doctor gradually relinquished his profession, and devoted himself to the care of his large real estate interests. Besides valuable property in this state, he owns some 2,000 acres in Kansas. Mr. SWAYZE was a graduate of Princeton College, and for years practiced law in New Jersey, until he lost his voice and then learned surgery. He owns 500 acres of valuable land in this state. Dr. PERRY has been largely identified with the Wenona Fair, and is an active, well informed, substantial citizen. In his house are four generations.

Benjamin JUDD

Mr. JUDD was born in North Carolina in 1829, and moved with his parents to Illinois in 1831 and located in this township. He married Francis TALBOT in 1851. She was born in Chester county, Pa., in 1834. They have seven children - Elizabeth, (Mrs. KEMP), Nelson P., James A., Thomas B., Clara J., Mary F. and Julia Dell. He is a member of the Masonic order and the Star Chapter. He is secretary of the Local Protection society and member of the Grange. He owns 160 acres of land, all under excellent cultivation.

Mrs. R. M. CAHOON, Dress and Cloak-maker, Wenona.

Mrs. CAHOON was born in Barnstable county, Mass., in 1828. She married Mr. L. CAHOON in 1847. He was born in New York state. Moved west in 1860, and located in Osage township, LaSalle county, Ill. They came to Wenona in 1871. They have three children living - Sarah J., George W. and Charles. She has been engaged in the dressmaking business since 1846, and lived in Wenona since 1862. She keeps on hand a full stock of all kinds of fancy trimmings, and is an accomplished and competent dressmaker.

N. F. BROWN

Mr. BROWN is a farmer, and was born in Fayette county, Pa., in 1831, He located in LaSalle county with his parents when quite young, and married Miss Matilda JUDD in 1855. She was born in Evans township, Marshall county, Illinois. She is the youngest child of Thomas and Elizabeth JUDD, two of the oldest settlers of Marshall county. They have three children Almeda E., May A. and S. Benton. They own 160 acres of land. They have two children deceased Alice A. and Fany -the former died when between five and six years old, and the latter between two and a half and three years old.

Adam BRUNNER

Mr. BRUNNER is a shoemaker, engaged in business in Wenona. He was born in Wurtemburg, Germany, in 1850, and came to the United States in the fall of 1870, locating in Dwight, Livingston county, where he lived until he came to Wenona, in the spring of 1873. He commenced business at his trade, which he learned in the old country, and has been working at it since 1865. He owns a house and lot in Wenona, and is well to do. He is master of his profession, and enjoys the reputation of a first-class shoemaker.

Peter G. DEFENBAUGH

Mr. DEFENBAUGH lives on his farm in Evans township, but his postofflce is Magnolia. He was born in Fairfield county, Ohio, in 1821, and moved to Marshall county in 1851, and married Sarah A. L. WALTER, born in Pennsylvania. They have nine children - Zachariach, Eluchie, Allan, Durriah, Mary, Emma, Francis, William C., Edwin and Louisa (deceased). They are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian church. He has been school director several times and is trustee now. He owns 139 acres of land in Marshall county, and 80 acres in La Salle county. He is a kind, generous hearted man, and a good citizen and neighbor.

Mrs. Euphemia CROFT

Mrs. CROFT, widow of H. CROFT, whose biography is given elsewhere, was born in Durbin county, Indiana, in 1832, and moved to Marshall county when a child, with her parents in 1833, and located on the farm she is now occupying. She married Hutchison CROFT in 1850. He died in March, 1878, leaving four children - Samuel M., Emma (Mrs. KIRKPATRICK), Julia A, and James. Are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian church. The estate contains about 1200 acres of land, all improved. Her fine residence was burnt down in April, 1880.

Miss Susan WOOLF AND Mrs. S. P. HALLAM, Dress-makers, Wenona

The subjects of this sketch, having opened up their establishment in August, 1879, are prepared to do all kinds of dress-making, plain and fashionable, at the shortest notice. Miss WOOLF is a native of Muskingum county, Ohio, and came with her parents to Marshall county in 1858. She is a member of the M. E. church. Mrs. HALLAM is a native of Guernsey county, Ohio, and moved to Richland county, Ill., in 1861, and to Rutland in 1866. She married Mr. S. P. HALLAM in 1867. He is a native of Washington county, Pa. They have three children - Anna M., Myro L. and Henry G. They are members of the Methodist church.

E. M. HUNTER (widow)

Mrs. HUNTER was born in Philadelphia, and came to Ohio with her parents when seven years old, and to La Salle county two years later. She married William PHILLIPS in 1850. She was only 13 years old. He was born in England. They have three children - Nelson, Clara, and Fannie. He died in Oct. 1864. Mrs. HUNTER owns a farm at Lostant, La Salle county, of 62 acres and a home and 4 lots. She sold a farm of 160 acres, in 1876, which she distributed among her children, who are all married. Mrs. HUNTER is a dressmaker and follows her business industriously, although having no necessity to do so. She prefers business to occupy her mind. She has purchased the property she is now occupying, subject to minor's claim, having rented her own large residence at Lostant, as she did not require so large a house since her children married.

John I. PARSONS

Mr. PARSONS was born in Putnam county, near Magnolia, in 1848. He is a son of Isaac PARSONS, who moved from Missouri and settled in Putnam county at an early day. Mr. PARSONS married Ada S. HOPPER in 1873. She was born in Sangamon county, near Springfield, Ill. Their children are Hallie, Annie, Edward H., and Mary Ada. Are members of the Presbyterian church. He has the management of his father's property, which, including his homestead of 50 acres, embraces six farms, consisting of 1030 acres in this state, and 455 acres owned by himself.

L. A. McCULLM

Mr. McCULLM is a hair-dresser living in Wenona. He was born in Putnam county in 1852, and come to Wenona in 1874. In January, 1874, he married Miss Emma CARSON, born in Andrew county, Mo. They have two children, Clara Bell and Mary Louisa. He is a member of the I. O. O. F. He has a first-class establishment, and is the only one in Wenona. Has been nine years in the business, and makes money.

Mrs. H. N. McCLANAHAN, Widow

Wenona, Illinois.

William M. HAMILTON

I was born in Muskingum county, Ohio, October 13, 1816. My father was Rev. Wm. HAMILTON. I am the second son of twelve children, ten sons and two daughters, all of whom grew up to be men and women. The psalmist says, "I have been young and now am old, yet have I not seen the righteous forsaken nor his seed begging bread." I always considered my father a righteous man, and he must have been such, for I never knew of any of his seed begging bread. Five of his sons followed farming, three were doctors, one preacher, and one was an editor also a member of the Ohio legislature for a number of years; at the time of his death he was a representative in Congress. One son, Dr. J. W. HAMILTON, has obtained some notoriety as a surgeon in Columbus, Ohio. His son, Dr. T. B. HAMILTON, was surgeon of the 104th Illinois regiment, and died at Nashville, Tenn. My father died in the 78th year of his age. His sons ranged in height from five feet six inches to six feet two. I being the nearest the ninth part of a man, my father bound me to Hon. James HENDERSON, of Zanesville, Ohio, for the term of six years to learn the tailoring trade. Nothing unusual or strange took place in my life until I was in the 11th and 12th years of my age. In those days almost every family kept liquor to be drank as a beverage. My father, though averse to drunkenness, kept whiskey in his closet by the barrel and a bottle in the cupboard, thus affording a chance to take a dram when I wanted it. My visits to the old cupboard became more and more frequent, till at length it was noised around that little Bill HAMILTON was a drunkard. My sister, becoming alarmed, conveyed to my father the sad news. He called me to him and in an affectionate tone of voice said, "William, your sister tells me that you have become a drunkard. My son, I would rather follow you to your grave than you should become such.'' Thus, through the watchful care of my dear sister and the timely admonition of a loving father, I was as a fire-brand plucked out of the burning. This occurrence took place in harvest time just after the organization of the first temperance society in that region, and my father had a number of hands employed. It was my office to wait on them with water and whiskey. One evening all the hands got ready to go to a temperance meeting, and I asked permission to go with them. On the way father's admonition kept ringing in my ears. "I would rather follow you to your grave than have you become a drunkard." After the lecture was over an opportunity was given to sign the pledge. The lecturer requested those who would sign to give their names. One of the young men that went with me sat in the seat in front of me, and I said. "Charles, I will sign," when he exclaimed in a loud voice, "Bill HAMILTON." We returned home at a late hour I had to pass through my father's bed-room to get to mine, and he was awake. Perhaps the sad news that he had learned from my sister had drove sleep from his eyes, and he may have been praying, as thousands of fathers and mothers are to-day - "Lord keep my son from the vices of this world and save him from going down into a drunkard's grave and a drunkard's hell." The first question he asked was, “William, were there many at the temperance meeting?" "Yes, sir: the house was full." "Who signed?" I named all I could recollect, and closed by saying I signed. He asked no more questions. I don't know how he passed the balance of the night, but think he must have felt like the old father who said, "This is my son that was lost and is found," and he, with those that were invited to the supper, began to be merry. In the fall of that year my father built a large barn, and in asking his neighbors to help him raise it he told them he would not have any liquor on the occasion. All came that were invited, and the frame went up nicely. Never after this did my father keep liquor in his house to be drank as a beverage. In the 13th year of my age I joined the Methodist Protestant church, that was in derision called radical's church. A few years previous to this some of the leading spirits of the Methodist Episcopal church published a paper styled Mutual Rights, contending that the laity should have an equal voice in church government with the ministry. For publishing such views they were silenced, if not turned out of church. This transaction gave rise to the Methodist Protestant church, which now has a membership of over 100.000 in the United States. The day I was 15 years old I went to Zanesville to learn my trade, and served as an apprentice until I was 21. After working at my trade in Ohio until early in the spring of 1843 I took passage at Marietta, on the Ohio river, for Cincinnati, remained one week, and then started for St. Louis, where I arrived with 25 cents remaining in my pocket. While standing on the deck, up came a peddler with a basket of jewelry, and my last quarter went for a watch-key. I engaged board in the city at $2.50 per week, and at the end of three weeks I found myself $7.50 in debt, but I got a job and soon paid up my board bill, and commenced business in the upper part of the city and remained there until October, then took a trip up the Illinois river to visit my relations about Magnolia. In this month I was 27 years of age. Being highly pleased with the country, I commenced business in Magnolia, and continued it from the fall of 1843 to the summer of 1851. During this time made four trips to Ohio, one via the lakes, two by wagon and one on horseback. During my third visit I traded my spring wagon and a lot of clothing I had with me for three more horses, bought on time eighteen mules, and started for New Jersey, where I sold one-half interest in my drove at a very nice profit. Being late in the fall we did not find sale for our stock until near spring. Notwithstanding our heavy expenses, I returned to Ohio $250 gainer. I there bought another drove of 33, pastured them until the next November, and returned to Illinois. The latter part of August I started on horseback for Ohio. On my way through Indiana I bought seven head of mules and one horse. This made me a drove of 49 mules and two horses. At Zanesville, Ohio, I sold about one-half of my drove to California emigrants, and the balance I took to New Jersey. On this trip I cleared above all expenses $1002. I returned to Ohio and bought another drove of 40 mules and two horses, and hired their keeping until the latter part of that winter, and then drove them to Harrisburg, Pa., where I sold them at $800 profit, and then returned to Ohio. After giving away $500 I returned to Illinois with something over two thousand dollars, with a view to invest my funds in reserved lands of the Illinois Central R. R. They not coming into market as soon as expected, I bought a farm of 160 acres three miles northeast of Magnolia. I farmed one year, and then sold out to Daniel HORRAM at a handsome profit. I entered my Wenona lands January 10th, 1853, and my Chenoa lands Sept. 24th, 1853.

I was married to Rebecca BURNS, daughter of Andrew BURNS, Oct. 18, 1855, five days after I became 39 years of age. Should we live until Oct. 18. 1884, we may give our friends an invitation to attend our silver wedding. I voted the abolition ticket in 1838. After the organization of the Republican party with a plank in their platform opposing the extension of slavery, I became identified with that party, as did the majority of the abolitionists. My father once remarked to an aunt, “I am afraid that William will render himself unpopular on this abolition question." Truth is mighty and will prevail. It was not long until father and all my brothers were ranked among the abolitionists. In those days men were egged, stoned and shot dead for expressing their views. I once made the remark to a fellow stage passenger, "I believe the black man has just the same right to his freedom as you or I." He drew back his fist to strike me, and said, "you may compare yourself to a negro, but you shan't me." In the winter of 1833, I heard a minister lecture on temperance who advocated the enactment of municipal state and national prohibition laws. I have been of the opinion ever since that the strong arm of the law as well as every other lawful means should be brought to bear against this soul destroying traffic. In the winter of 1874, the Wenona temperance society elected Rev. MORROW and myself as delegates to attend a state prohibition convention at Bloomington. Since then, as opportunity affords, I have voted the prohibition ticket, but, as did the old abolitionists, hold myself ready to become identified with a party that can bring about the desired object quicker than the one I now support. In the winter of 1873 I drew up an amendment to section 2 of the dram shop act, making it unlawful to sell liquor in any quantity without first obtaining a license, also making it unlawful for the supervisors to grant license to sell liquor within three miles of any city, town or village. Previous to this time it could be sold by the quart without license. I sent the bill to Senator BALDWIN, which he introduced. It was referred to the Judiciary committee and reported hack to the Senate amended, making it unlawful to sell in less quantities than one gallon, and debaring the supervisors from granting license to sell liquor within two miles of the corporate limits of cities, towns or villages. Thus amended it passed both houses. Before the assembling of our last legislature I drew up another amendment to section 2, by adding, "provided cities, towns, and villages may enact ordinances prohibiting the sale of intoxicating liquor in any quantity, thus giving us a local law by which we could avoid the evils of selling by the gallon. This bill I sent to my nephew, J. M. HAMILTON, senator from Bloomington district. This bill was printed and ordered to the second reading. While thus pending I wrote to my nephew to amend the bill before its passage so as to give cities, towns and villages jurisdiction two miles beyond their corporate limits in prohibiting the sale of intoxicating liquors. In due time this amendment was presented, and referred to the Judiciary committee and there met the same fate of a number of other prohibition bills. I hope to live to see the day when the people of Illinois will elect representatives that will press the passage of such bills.

I served as school director in Wenona ten years, and was re-elected for a three years term. At the close of one year I resigned I was once a candidate for mayor of the city of Wenona on a no-license ticket, and was beaten. In the spring of 1872 I was nominated by the Republican party for county supervisor. Not feeling disposed to treat or leave money with saloon-keepers, to buy votes, and through the circulation of a lie, that I was opposed to a poor man having a vote, I ran behind my ticket, and was beaten five votes. In the fall of 1875 I went to California with my family, consisting of my wife and four children, with a view of remaining there five years. After sojourning there one year, along the coast from Clear Lake, 80 miles north of San Francisco, to San Diego, 6OO miles south, I became fully satisfied that the climate had been misrepresented, and returned home in the fall of 1876, believing the statement once made by David LAW, who died at Henry a few years since, was true. Said he, "I have traveled in every state in the Union, and I tell you, taking everything into consideration, there is not a better country in the world than this portion of Illinois." On my return home, I learned the saloon-keepers had hung me in effigy on the morning of my departure. When I heard George McADAM and other highly esteemed citizens say that I had never been more highly honored, I felt still more joyful in this tribulation. Two years since, Dr. REYNOLDS, of El Paso, in an introduction said to Rev. MILLSAP: "HAMILTON was one of the pioneers in the temperance work; that we are now occupying grounds that he occupied forty years ago;" and added, "Don't you recollect the time you visited me at Bowlingreen, Woodford county, some twenty-five years ago, that Elder R. invited us home with him on Sunday to take dinner, and that he had wine on the table, and how you opposed the practice?" At this writing I have just entered on the sixty-fourth year of my age. In reviewing my past life I can see where I have erred and misimproved time, and some acts of my life are brought to my recollection that gives me great satisfaction, of which I never will have an occasion to write. Wm. M. HAMILTON

William P. DITMAN

Farmer- Postoffice, Wenona.

William McQUAID

Painter, Wenona.

Extracted June 2011 from the Biographical Department in Records of the Olden Time

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